How to Use the Flash Voyager Go

 

Over the past couple of years, expandable storage has been getting increasingly rarefied in smartphones and tablets. This isn’t totally surprising; in the drive to make devices thinner and use internal space more optimally, even something as small as a MicroSD card slot can add thickness and take away real estate that could be used by the battery. Unfortunately, internal flash capacity hasn’t really advanced far enough to make up for the lack of expandable storage, and if you’re like me you probably have a decently-sized media library you’d like to be able to take with you.

Enter Flash Voyager Go.

The Flash Voyager Go functions as a standard USB 3.0 thumb drive (albeit a very tiny one), but has a micro-USB connector on the opposite end that allows it to be plugged in to any mobile device with USB On The Go (hereafter USB OTG) support. USB OTG is still a burgeoning standard and currently only working on certain Android devices; unfortunately Windows Phone and iOS users are still stuck with the cloud. But if you do have a device that supports USB OTG and thus the Flash Voyager Go, it can be very useful indeed.

OTG Compatibility List

Category

Brand Name

Model

O/S Version


Tablet PC

Acer

ICONIA A1-810

Android 4.2


Acer

ICONIA_Tab A700

Android 4.0


ASUS

MeMO Pad ME302

Android 4.2


ASUS

MeMO Pad 10 ME102

Android 4.2


ASUS

Transformer Pad TF-100

Windows 8.1


Fujitsu

LTE F-01D

Android 3.2


Huawei

MediaPad S7-301u(P)

Android 4.0


Lenovo

A3000

Android 4.2


Samsung

Note 8

Android 4.1


SONY

SGPT111JP/S

Android 3.2


SONY

SGPT112TW/S

Android 3.2


SONY

SGPT211JP/S

Android 3.2


Toshiba

AT700/35D

Android 3.2


Category

Brand Name

Model

O/S Version


Phone

HTC

Butterfly

Android 4.2


HTC

Butterfly S

Android 4.2


HTC

New One

Android 4.2


HTC

One X

Android 4.1


Samsung

GALAXY NOTE (GT-N7000)

Android 4.0


Samsung

GALAXY NOTE II (GT-N7100)

Android 4.1


Samsung

GALAXY NOTE III (GT-N900)

Android 4.3


Samsung

GALAXY R (GT-I9103)

Android 2.3


Samsung

GALAXY S2

 


Samsung

GALAXY S3

Android 4.0


Samsung

GALAXY S4

Android 4.2


Samsung

MAGA 6"3

Android 4.2


SONY

SONY XPERIA S (LT26i)

Android 4.0


SONY

SONY XPERIA Z (C6602)

Android 4.1


SONY

Xperia TX LT29i

Android 4.0


Xiaomi

2S(小米機)

Android 3.2


Xiaomi

紅米機

Android 4.2


The devices listed here should be able to reap the benefits of the Flash Voyager Go almost immediately; load it up with media, plug it in to your portable, and stream photos, music, and video.

On the Galaxy Note II in house, the integration was borderline seamless. You plug the Go into the micro-USB port on the Note II, and a notification appears. From there, the files on the Flash Voyager Go should appear seamlessly in the existing media applications available.

If you want to copy photos to and from a compatible Samsung device, it's also a breeze. The "My Files" app should open when you plug the drive into the device. From there, tap the checkbox(es) next to Photos, Video, and/or Music, then tap the three bars beneath the time. That will bring up a menu; "Move" is equivalent to a cut and paste, where the files are no longer on the source, while "Copy" will duplicate them to the drive you choose. On the Samsung device, the Flash Voyager Go will be visible as "UsbDriveA."

Android’s ecosystem isn’t quite as USB OTG friendly as we’d like just yet, but if you have a 2013 Nexus 7 or a Nexus 5, you should still be able to benefit through the use of the third party application Nexus Media Importer without having to root the device. Nexus Media Importer is $3.99, and it’s a little clunky, but for streaming your media on a Nexus device or moving files to and from the Flash Voyager Go, it’s very nearly the only game in town. I tested it with my own 2013 Nexus 7 and it worked perfectly fine, but note that Nexus Media Importer doesn't support the default exFAT file system; you'll need to format it to NTFS or FAT32 first. Moving files is a little more involved, too.

In Nexus Media Importer, you have to switch between import and export modes by tapping the three dots in the top right corner and choosing "Connect," then choosing Importer or Exporter. Importer allows you to read files from the drive and move them to the device, while Exporter allows you to copy files from your device to the drive. Then, under "Advanced" on the Nexus Media Importer main menu, highlight the folders or files you want to copy in the top pane, then open the folder you want to copy them to in the bottom pane. Tap the down arrow in the top right and tap "Copy," and you're all set.

Internal storage is often painfully limited on mobile devices, but like the big brother Voyager Air, the Flash Voyager Go is just one more way to take everything with you.

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