Meet the Modders: Laine

By Johan Nyman, on 6. November 2015

We here at Corsair love to see all kinds of custom builds from modders around the world. I personally take interest in scratch builds. I think it is interesting how people can make their own cases with some material and a few tools.

This week we talked with the very talented Swedish modder, Laine, about his most recent project Luna.

1. Tell me a little bit about yourself?

I’m Simon “Laine”. I live on an island off the south coast of Sweden in the city of Karlskrona. Here I have a small workshop that I share with two friends.  We all spend a lot of time working on various projects. I enjoy metalworking but recently I’ve also started to dabble in woodwork too.

2. When did you start modding and what got you into it?

2008 was the first time I put a Dremel to a PC case, but I started for real in 2009 with a complete mod. I’ve always been inspired by Nils and Charles with the Million Dollar PC and MurderMod, but also Attila Lukacs's beautiful scratch built pieces of art. They always seemed to make anything they could find into something impressive.

3. Where did you get the idea to mod and watercool a Brix-system?

It was during Dreamhack I met Ted at Gigabyte, at their stand. “Hi, can I watercool a Brix” was an ongoing joke with us during the event, just because it’s such a weird thing to put watercooling on that tiny of a formfactor.

4. What hardware did you use in this project?

Gigabyte BRIX Pro GB-BXi7-4770R motherboard with Corsair Vengeance DDR3L 2x8GB 1600MHz and Sandisk 128GB mSata SSD.

5. There is no waterblock made for the BRIX systems.  How did you solve this?

I reused a lot of older stuff, watercooling-wise. The waterblock is actually made by EKWB and is a block meant for a 780i motherboard from back in 2008. The reservoir is just as old. With a little bit of work, it felt like it was almost made for the BRIX.

6. What has been the biggest challenge with this project?

The electronics, no doubt. The schematics for this thing is impossible to find and all the cables are black. Ha ha! I managed to splice the PWM header into PWM for the fan and use just the +12V with 100% cycle to power the pump.  I also wired out an external start button - but not much else.

7. In several of your projects I have seen that you create things that wont be seen in the finished project, whats the idea behind those things?

If it looks like a challenge, or just fun to make, I’m making it. If it ends up showing up, that’s great.  If it doesn’t, well... it was still fun to make. I like the phrase “everything is important” that Singer and Emory work by. Even if others don’t know, you still do.

8. What is your favorite Corsair product?

Have to say it’s the original Dominator GT DDR3-series, where you could tell what ram someone was sporting just by the colour of the heatsink. The faster blue and red ones were replicated a lot. I liked that. There was also that really tall heatsink for 2400MHz, which reminds me of coloured engine blocks and the Daytona wing from the classic muscle car era.

9. Sadly those would not be compatible with a small BRIX system, but we were still able to send you the Vengeance DDR3L kit. What did you think about those?

Fairly clean styling and a really nice black PCB, rare to find on DD3L sticks.

10. Where did you find your inspiration for Luna?

From vintage aeronautical design and history. It’s been through several design stages but this last one was the most interesting one. There is always a story to be told about aviation.

11. In your projects you work a lot with hand tools, where did you learn to use those?

I’m still learning to use those.  Ha ha. But in the beginning I never really owned any tools of my own, but my father always made things by hand. Besides a Dremel, the hand tools were all we had around to use.  When I made the transition to all aluminum cases, it all started to make much more sense.

12. All your photos in your build-logs are of really high quality, even the work in progress pictures. Your final photos are often a kind of lifestyle type of photos, what is the idea behind that?

I've got a real passion for photography, and working on these projects gives me the perfect opportunity to combine the two. It's a joy finding the right angle and light, even if it's just a progress shoot.

For final pictures, I want to tell a story. Not just display the finished piece but to create a surrounding where it belongs.

We want to give a big thank you to Simon for letting us interview him and for sharing all these beautiful images. We are looking forward to see your next project!


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